This morning, a seven-month-old sea otter warmed the hearts of onlookers as she splished and splashed in her new habitat at the Vancouver Aquarium.

The young pup, who has yet to be named, was spotted this past fall on the side of a road in Homer, Alaska. After efforts to locate her mother were unsuccessful, the Alaska SeaLife Center brought the distressed animal to its I.Sea.U for emergency treatment and critical care. The Center invited Vancouver Aquarium’s animal care team to help provide intensive, around-the-clock care for the otter, a collaboration that helps to expand rescue and rehabilitation expertise across North American teams.

At eight weeks old, the sea otter pup was deemed non-releasable by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service due to the maternal care required by young otters to survive in the wild. At her permanent home in Vancouver, the Aquarium is able to provide her with the ongoing care she needs.

The playful and “sometimes mischievous” little otter is adjusting well to her new home and will soon be introduced to Tanu, one of the sea otters at the Aquarium, in an adjacent otter habitat. It is anticipated that Tanu will embrace the new otter as a friend and help her adjust to her new surroundings.

London Air Services provided safe transport for the sea otter and Vancouver Aquarium's animal care team.

London Air Services provided safe transport for the sea otter and Vancouver Aquarium’s animal care team.

Many thanks are shared with London Air Services for providing safe transport for the sea otter and Vancouver Aquarium’s animal-care team who had been providing critical care for the otter in Alaska.

The sea otter pup still needs a name, and we need your help naming her. Our friends at the Alaska SeaLife Center, and their Ocean Sciences Club students, have helped us select three possible names to choose from (Susitna, Katmai and Glacier). Learn how to cast your vote on our contest page.

Vancouver Aquarium is a self-supporting non-profit organization, and does not receive ongoing funds to provide around-the-clock care for its rescued and rehabilitated animals. To make a contribution to help this sea otter and others like it, please visit here.

 

 

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5 Responses

  1. Arline McFarlane

    What saved the stranded sea otter was obvious; Cuddles. Lots and lots of cuddles, to let her know she is safe and with people who will love and care for her, all his life.
    So, I would name her “Cuddles” because she gives and receives; so much love.

    Reply
  2. Abbey

    Hi, my name is Abbey and I am 11 years old. I was at the aquarium just today and one of the staff members told me about how the baby sea otter was not yet named and told me that i could go online and enter a name so that’s exactly what i did.I think a good name for the baby sea otter would be euphoria, because sea otters are very jolly and euphoria means jolly. I hope you like my suggestion.

    Reply
    • Vancouver Aquarium

      Thank you Abbey for your note, and for your enthusiasm for helping to name our new sea otter pup! You can find out more about the sea otter naming contest at this website here. There are three possible names to choose from, and this page provides more information about how the three name choices were selected. Good luck!

      Reply
    • Vancouver Aquarium

      Thank you for your suggestion, and for your enthusiasm for helping to name our new sea otter pup! The naming contest is being conducted on Twitter, and you can find more details at this website here. There are three possible names to choose from, and this page provides more information about how the three name choices were selected. Good luck!

      Reply

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